Accredited Degree Life Experience

Accredited Degree Life Experience : Degrees In Fashion Merchandising : Graduate Degree In.

Accredited Degree Life Experience

accredited degree life experience

    accredited degree

  • (Accredited Degrees) Educational accreditation is a type of quality assurance process under which services and operations of post-secondary educational institutions or programs are evaluated by an external body to determine if applicable standards are met.

    life experience

  • (Life experiences) Job loss, financial difficulties, long periods of unemployment, the loss of a spouse or other family member, or other traumatic events may trigger depression. Long-term stress, at home, work or school, can also be involved.
  • (LIFE EXPERIENCES) In reading this profile, it is important to understand that everything has not been “perfect” for Kim Bailey.

accredited degree life experience – One Year

One Year to Your College Degree
One Year to Your College Degree
How to Get College Credit For What You Already Know. According to U.S. Census Bureau statistics, people with a bachelor’s degree earn over sixty percent more on average than those with only a high school diploma. Over a lifetime, the gap in earning potential between a high school diploma and a B.A. (or higher) is more than $1,000,000—yes, one million dollars.

If a little voice inside of you says that you deserve a college degree for what you already know, if you believe you know more than the new employee who is straight out of college, if you are willing to commit two hours a day to study, then you are one year away from your college degree.

This program is about getting credit for what you already know using techniques such as testing out, courses and workshops that you have already completed, military experience, and prior learning assessment portfolios. The advantage of this method is that it is much faster, cheaper and more flexible than taking courses, even if you take the courses online. You can earn a regionally accredited (the gold standard of accreditation in the U.S.) bachelor’s degree in a year or less, but only commit yourself to two hours a day. You just need to be of reasonable intelligence, have a high school diploma or equivalent, and read and write English at the level expected of someone who has graduated high school with a diploma.

How to Get College Credit For What You Already Know. According to U.S. Census Bureau statistics, people with a bachelor’s degree earn over sixty percent more on average than those with only a high school diploma. Over a lifetime, the gap in earning potential between a high school diploma and a B.A. (or higher) is more than $1,000,000—yes, one million dollars.

If a little voice inside of you says that you deserve a college degree for what you already know, if you believe you know more than the new employee who is straight out of college, if you are willing to commit two hours a day to study, then you are one year away from your college degree.

This program is about getting credit for what you already know using techniques such as testing out, courses and workshops that you have already completed, military experience, and prior learning assessment portfolios. The advantage of this method is that it is much faster, cheaper and more flexible than taking courses, even if you take the courses online. You can earn a regionally accredited (the gold standard of accreditation in the U.S.) bachelor’s degree in a year or less, but only commit yourself to two hours a day. You just need to be of reasonable intelligence, have a high school diploma or equivalent, and read and write English at the level expected of someone who has graduated high school with a diploma.

James E. Hawkins

James E. Hawkins
James E. Hawkins, present Solicitor for Jeflferson County, was born at Elyton, in the residence now owned and occupied by Dr. A. Eubank, near the " Big Spring," April 10, 1851, the third son of Dr. Nathaniel Hawkins.

He comes from an ancestry, on both sides, of honest, sturdy, and industrious stock, making no pretension to nor coveting any of the glitter and show of life, but resting deservedly upon genuine worth. His grand father, Williamson Hawkins, was one of the first white men to invade the forest of Jones Valley with his gun and axe, and share its primitive fastnesses with the Indian, the bear, and the panther, having settled in the valley from South Carolina, about where Woods Station or Woodlawn now is, in the year 1813, soon afterward moving over to Village Creek, on what has, for three-quarters of a century, been known as the Hawkins plantation, the property now embracing Pratt Mines and the Thomas plant, where he lived until his death, in 1876, leaving a large number of children, grandchildren, great grandchildren, and great great grandchildren. Out of five sons, his third son, Nathaniel, alone showed any taste or disposition for acquiring more than an ordinary education, and he became a ripe scholar, and after his marriage, attended a medical college in New York, and made reputation, during a long and useful life, as a physician of extraordinary judgment and skill, and, dying in 1877, left his family comfortable in worldly goods and rich in the heritage of a good name.

The wife of Dr. Nathaniel Hawkins was Miss Maria Welton, daughter of a farmer in New England, whose family comprised the original proprietors of the towns of Farmington, Mattatuck, Waterbury, and other New England colonial towns, all of whom held, with sacred fidelity, to the articles signed in 1674. Miss Welton proved a strong and congenial helpmate, with her energy, nerve, and fine accomplishments, to her young Southern husband, and much of his success is justly accredited to her influence and ambition. She was practically the founder of the Episcopal Church in Jefferson County, and, without a pastor or a joint communicant for forty years, held to the faith and labored for her church until she lived to see a new generation grow up to support her cherished cause as she declined down the hill of life. She died in 1883, at the age of seventy-six years, at the old homestead at Elyton.

As all Southern fortunes were swept away by the war, the training young James’ father had given him as a farmer boy stood him in good turn now, for he and his younger brothers took up the plow and finished out the rows, where the negroes had left them when Wilson’s raid stopped farming operations here in the spring of 1865. For four years he continued to make a good hand, when needed, on the farm. In 1869 the University of Alabama was in the hands of a radical board, who were little better than the vandals who destroyed the buildings. Mr. Hawkins therefore decided to enter the University of the South at Sewanee, Tenn. He was the seventeenth student who matriculated in that institution. He remained at college three years and finished his course as then prepared there, but took no degrees, as the University had not then arranged degrees. He was admitted to the bar before Judge Mudd, in September, 1872, after six months hard study in a law office. In November, of the same year, he married Miss Tempe Fitts, of Tuscaloosa, and has since practiced law in this county. He inherits, in a large degree, the combined virtues of his parents, having the activity, push, sagacity, and ambition of the Yankee, and the courage, judgment, common sense, and genial afiability of his paternal Southern ancestry. Unlike his relatives here, he soon showed a decided taste for public lite, and his profession gave him full opportunities to cultivate this taste. He became at once prominent as a worker and writer in the hard-fought political contests waged after he attained majority.

In December, 1874, he moved to Shelby County, to take a law partnership with Senator John T. Morgan, who was then overloaded with practice in that county, and just entering into politics. He remained there for only two years, the only period of his life spent in residence outside of Jefferson County. While in Shelby County with Mr. William McMath, now deceased, Mr. Hawkins founded and edited the Shelby Sentinel, now owned and published by Mr. McCall, at Calera, and did strong work for the cause of good government and white supremacy in that part of the State. After returning home, he bought an interest in the Jefferson Independent, and for four years was the political editor of that influential paper. For some time he was general guardian of the county, and resigned this position in 1881. In 1880 he was the Democratic nominee for representative in the lower house of the legislature, and was defeated, after a hot contest on the stump, by a majority of seven. Again, in 1882,

This Back-to-School Season, WGW Washington Declares, “No Parent Left Behind”

This Back-to-School Season, WGW Washington Declares, “No Parent Left Behind”
Across the state, parents are buying school supplies, loading backpacks, and packing lunches as their kids head back to school. With carpools, afterschool activities, and homework added to schedules already packed with work and other family responsibilities, the last thing more parents have time to consider is heading back to school themselves. But, they should be….

Nearly half a million Washington residents, many of them parents, have started but not finished a college degree; yet by 2018, two-thirds of all jobs in the state will require at least some post-secondary education. A bachelor’s or master’s degree can bring career advancement, increase job security, and enhance earning potential, so how can busy parents finish their degrees and avoid being left behind?

For parents with over-scheduled lives and tight budgets, the prospect of heading back to college can be a daunting one. There are a number of college options, but few that are affordable and flexible enough to meet the needs of working adults. Washington’s new online university, WGU Washington, washington.wgu.edu, is designed to meet the needs of students with family and work obligations, and to do it affordably. Nonprofit and endorsed by the state, WGU Washington offers 50 accredited bachelor’s and master’s degree programs in the high-demand career fields of business, information technology, teacher education and health professions, including nursing.

WGU Washington’s programs are structured to allow students to move quickly through what they already know and to focus on what they still need to learn. WGU Washington students advance by demonstrating what they know, not by logging time in class. This learning model, which includes the support of a dedicated mentor, is called competency-based education, and it represents a truly new and innovative approach to higher education.

At less than $3,000 per six-month term (and no limit on the number of courses per term), WGU is about half the cost of most other online universities and considerably less than most of Washington’s public universities. Because students can leverage their experience and prior college to help them move as quickly through courses as they are able, the average time to complete a bachelor’s degree at WGU Washington is just two-and-a-half years—an average cost of about $15,000.

As a parent, it’s likely that you are already talking to your kids about college, encouraging them to plan to attend and highlighting the benefits of earning a degree. And, as all good parents know, kids learn best by example. Finishing a degree means more than career advancement and better earning potential—it is a priceless accomplishment that demonstrates the value of education to your children. This back-to-school season, don’t be left behind.

accredited degree life experience

accredited degree life experience

Campus-Free College Degrees: Accredited Off-Campus College Degree Programs
This comprehensive guide includes more than 150 accredited bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral degree programs that require little or no time at all on campus! In addition to traditional degrees, you can also learn how to earn college credit for:
Correspondence Study
Military Experience
Diplomas
Bible Studies
Experimental Learning
Certificates
Associate Degrees
Campus-Free College Degrees can help you find the environment that’s right for you, including:
Correspondence
Group Study
Internships
Videotapes
Independent Study
Seminars
Audiocassettes
Telecourses
Whether you want to earn a degree, increase your salary, or just add to your lifelong learning, Campus-Free College Degrees is the perfect resource. Unlock your earning and learning potential today!
This complete resource covers all the important information you want to know. A typical entry will include:
Detailed contact information, including email and Web addresses
Degrees offered
Time spent on campus (if any)
Accrediting organization
And a comprehensive description